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cricket memorabilia

  • Third test England India

    Posted on August 3, 2011 by Selby



    Let’s see what Gambhir can do at Edgbaston, India’s tailenders need to keep it together in order to retain their number one ranking, it will be interesting to see who's in the side  for the occasion.


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • Test match fourth day

    Posted on July 25, 2011 by Selby



    Watchable teamwork from Prior  and Broad, Prior's attacking style a thorn in the side for the visitors,Leave the Warner Stand for 10 mins and you miss something, today should be riveting from my point of view, weather could be a problem???


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • England cricket

    Posted on July 23, 2011 by Selby

    You can’t beat it his 18thtest century was completed in vintage Pietersen style and a joy to watch from the Warner stand it is interesting to note that he hit only 3 scoring shots to the offside, so what of the Indian field tactics, this was so well timed and just what we needed, should be another fascinating day on Sat.  All eyes on Sachin Tendulkar 100 international 100s moment of history coming up, what a moment for both him and Indian cricket, great mora booster???


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • India England

    Posted on July 22, 2011 by Selby



    Good start by India, better if they  tightened up the fielding

    worthy example set by Trott after only 49 overs, weather due to improve 2nd day!!!


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • New Zealand captain

    Posted on June 23, 2011 by Selby



    This is a sports memorabilia blog

    Ross Taylor could be the answer for New Zealand as successor to McCullum, as New Zealand captain. He deserved to have his position made permanent.
    Ross the competitive 27 year old middle order batsman is preferred choice of the 3 man New Zealand selection committee.
    Ross has performed well since taking over as stand in  cricket captain having recently beaten both Australia and Pakistan; he has adapted a strong mind-set and is not considering draws in the future but going all out to win.

    Australia and Pakistan have always maintained a high presence in sports memorabilia field.

    sports collectable series of blogs


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • Sri Lanka cricket - ladies going back to work

    Posted on June 19, 2011 by Selby



    This is a cricket memorabilia blog

    It seems Sri Lanka womens cricket squad can’t find a sponsor for their ladies team and some ladies are already signing up for military enlistment, however it is understood they are not expected to take part full scale military operations. (thank god)
    Since achieving test status most players are happily occupied juggling work between playing for the national team.
    Sponsors seem few and far between let’s just hope they keep their focus on the wicket.
    They seem to be doing fine at the Rose Bowl.

    Sports memorabilia series of blogs


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • sports memorabilia for sale

    Posted on June 1, 2011 by Selby



    sports memorabilia

    This is a cricket memorabilia blog

    Among a lot of interesting sports memorabilia items for auction in Chester today I am particularly interested in the following two:
    Warsop of Marylebone cricket bat which is hand signed by the Invincibles 1948,although not signed by the home side, this was Bradman’s fourth and final tour England, this tour was so popular that it was almost impossible to get into the ground at most venues, Australia won the five tests and that’s what makes this hand signed bat so interesting.
    It has a low estimate and if as described  I think it could make a lot more, still a nice bit of cricketing history.
    The second item is a Lancashire CC silver tray presented to John Thomas Tyldesley by Lancashire CC in 1910,as he was regarded as the finest proff batsman in county cricket around 1900 (3041 runs) in 1901, it comes together with an engraved cricket ball. so have to see how the bidding trends pan out.

    Also 1940 hardback Wisden almanack, very sought after war year, condition all important

    Dunlop golf Caddy advertising figurine with 5 golf clubs in bag should make a great addition to any golf memorabilia collection.

    Having said that the sale is packed with interesting hand signed sports memorabilia covering a range of activities.

    A SPORTS MEMORBILIA ARTICLE


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • The Bloody Ashes

    Posted on May 19, 2011 by Selby




    THE BLOODY ASHES

    The season of 1932-33 (significant as a vintage year for cricket memorabilia), saw one of the most significant events in cricketing history, an event which would strain the Anglo Australian relationship to the very limit.
    It all began with a conversation in the Piccadilly hotel London between England Captain Douglas Jardine (Notts), a player who was obsessive in his will to win, Captain Arthur Carr, (Notts), and two skilful fast bowlers Harold Larwood, (Notts) and Bill Voce, (Notts).
    Top of the agenda that day was the subject of fast leg theory, a highly controversial bowling technique which involved bowling a short fast pitched ball on the leg stump with a circle of usually at least five fielders set close in on the leg side. The reasoning behind this was that the batsman could usually only play the ball to the leg side often causing leg side deflections off the upper edge of the bat, ready to be caught by the quadrant of fielders behind square leg.
    The reason behind the meeting was the style in which Australia had toured England in 1930, Don Bradman’s batting had run riot with the English attack, and an average of 140 runs saw Australia win the test series 2-1
    Studies from cine film and player opinion had been made of Bradman’s batting and it was noted that he seemed to be uncomfortable addressing deliveries which pitched short, bounced high and rose towards him in line with leg stump, a style of bowling seen by many to be both intimidating and physically threatening.
    In an attempt to curb Bradman’s skilful batting prowess Jardine decided to utilise this form of bowling attack in the forthcoming encounter, later to become known as Bodyline series.
    The fast leg-theory attack had been tried at Trent Bridge - and also at Kennington Oval the previous August. Not everybody who saw it admired it however Jardine decided it was the very thing to solve the Bradman dilemma
    The following two seasons of county cricket saw Larwood and Voce practicing their talents both in the nets and on the pitch much to the discomfort and occasionally fitness of the opposing batsman.
    England’s pace bowlers were ready now for the hard fast Australian bowling surfaces.
    With the1932/33 Australian test series underway it was not until the third test of the series at Adelaide that the wicket was considered ideal for this form of delivery and the tactics were successfully used by the England team.
    Widespread condemnation quickly followed as a number of Australian batsman left the crease either injured or having made disappointing scores, it was after a particularly unsavoury incident in which Bert Oldfield was rendered unconscious by a head strike resulting in a fractured skull, that the crowd became angry and a near riot broke out.
    Bradman for his part dealt with the bowling attack in the unorthodox manner of moving around the crease towards the leg side, away from the line of the ball, cutting the delivery into the relatively unoccupied offside mid field.
    Bradman averaged 56.57 in the series, an average which although below par for him was still an enviable performance.
    The final outcome was a 4-1 England win; the scorecard shows Larwood’s bowling averages 19.51 per wicket having taken 33 wickets.
    At the series end relationships between the teams were at an all-time low. The Australian Board of Control were soon to contact the MCC proclaiming their indignation and suggesting relationships between the two countries were in jeopardy as a result of this form of gamesmanship.
    The MCC passed a resolution in 1935 that 'any form of bowling which is obviously a direct attack by the bowler upon the batsman would be an offence against the spirit of the game'.
    It was a quarter of a century later that measures were taken restricting the number of players allowed to be placed behind square leg to two, this effectively put an end to a potential revival of bodyline tactics.
    As time went by relations between the two countries were restored and now the Ashes series is much looked forward to and enjoyed all over the world.
    On his retirement from cricket Harold Larwood emigrated to Australia where he lived in Sydney until his death at the age of 90.
    cricket memorabilia from the controversial bodyline series is highly sought after and signed scorecards, handwritten letters, advertising material, photographs etc. are always in demand.
    Tony Selby
    cricketcollectables.net

    sports memorabilia articles


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • Collecting Cricket Memorabilia

    Posted on May 9, 2011 by Selby



     

    Collecting  cricket memorabilia

    Cricket memorabilia is one of the fastest growing areas in the sports collectables field.
    1864 saw the first publication of the “Bible of cricket” the Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack and this is certainly an area worth concentrating on. The founder John Wisden (1826-1854) created the longest running sports annual in history. The Wisden has been produced in both hard back form and soft cover, the hardback version being the collectors preference was first printed in 1896. The most sought after category is the first issue covering 1864-1875. As a collector one would need to take the long term view and ideally given the time, perseverance and resources would aim to eventually assemble a full set of these informative volumes. A number of individual books become available on a regular basis, recent editions which have interested me are the hardback versions 1901, 10,11,12, I am currently purchasing a 1945 hardback (one of 1500),and am interested in 1942 one of only 900 copies.
    I recently purchased W.G. Grace “Cricket”(1891) signed by the author, an excellent read and much sought after, it was published in (1891) so great care needs to be taken enjoying the content of rare books.
    As with all sports memorabilia condition is important but I feel consideration in the case of Wisden must be given to age and usage. Wartime editions are always popular collectables usually owing to limited production.
    County cricket memorabilia is often high on a collectors agenda as items may be specific to one particular county narrowing down the search, incidentally County cricket teams began forming around 1660, usually encouraged by local aristocracy, dignitaries and landowners of the Shire who had begun showing an interest in village green cricket and wished to encourage the locals to enjoy the game, possibly some becoming the first cricket professionals. It was not until 1963 that the distinction between amateur and professional was finally abolished in English cricket.
    Popular county sports memorabilia may include blazer pockets, club photos, attire, dinner menus etc.
    Ashes collectables are probably the most popular pieces and it is worth noting the importance of various dates for example the 1948 series would mean more to the serious collector than the ‘38 series, bodyline series always stands out and seems to command good prices, signed scorecards are always popular especially if they are completed and scores printed as opposed to hand written.
    Autographs are very collectable with an enormous variance in value for example Edmund Peate, Yorks, England may fetch £500, James Lillywhite £600 whereas Don Bradman a much admired icon of cricket a lot less, some cricketers were prolific writers others not so.
    My advice to an aspiring collector would be to study the subject, attend auctions and take notes then over time analyze the trends, a good start may well be Knights Sporting Auctions in Norwich.
    Of course the holy grail of cricket memorabilia is the Ashes, kept at Lords, the home of cricket, St Johns Wood, London.

    Written by Selby
    cricketcollectables.net

     


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia

  • Interesting thoughts about cricket memorabilia http://ezinearticles.com/featured/

    Posted on May 5, 2011 by Selby

     


    A sports memorabilia article

    The origins of cricket

    The summers of mid 16th century England saw the beginnings of what was to become the nation’s most fashionable sport
    The game of cricket originated in Saxon times in the woodland clearings of the weald in South-Eastern England. 1598 is the earliest reference where the game is referred to as creckett.

    Cricket gained in popularity and continued to be enjoyed throughout the 17th century played notably on Sundays after church, this being for many a time for leisure and respite from the arduous working week

    Wickets could be up to six feet wide and only a few inches high. Pitch dimensions, equipment and playing decisions were variable, the bat resembling a GAA hurling stick and four ball overs delivered underarm along the surface of the wicket. In 1760 pitching the ball became an accepted method of delivery. It was not until 1864 that overarm deliveries became the norm, this incidentally was also the year of the publication of the first Wisden Cricketers Almanac

    At this time in England betting was on the increase and before long much of its focus was on what was fast becoming the national game.

    County cricket teams began forming around 1660, usually encouraged by local aristocracy, dignitaries and landowners of the Shire who now showing an interest in village green cricket had begun to encourage the locals, possibly some becoming the first cricket professionals. It was not until 1963 that the distinction between amateur and professional was finally abolished in English cricket.

    In 1744 the laws of cricked were formally drawn up by the Stars and Garter club later to become the Marylebone Cricket Club.

    .1794 saw the first recorded inter-schools match: Charterhouse v Westminster

    1806 saw the first Gentlemen v Players match at Lord's later to become the home of MCC

    In 1877 England playing in Melbourne lost their first Test Match against Australia by 45 runs, 1880 saw the first Test played in England resulting in a 5 wicket win against Australia at the Oval, this was also the venue for their defeat to Australia in 1882.
    A member of the Sporting Times reported “the England team is in ashes” thus began the era of the Ashes. (some of the best cricket memorabilia available)
    The ashes of a bail, the ultimate sports memorabilia, contained in a small ceramic urn are still fiercely contested today.
    A label containing a six line verse is pasted on the urn. This is the fourth verse of a song-lyric published in Melbourne Punch on 1 February 1883:

    When Ivo goes back with the urn, the urn; Studds, Steel, Read and Tylecote return, return; The welkin will ring loud, The great crowd will feel proud, Seeing Barlow and Bates with the urn, the urn; And the rest coming home with the urn. In February 1883, just before the disputed Fourth Test, a velvet bag made by Mrs Ann Fletcher, the daughter of Joseph Hines Clarke and Marion Wright, both of Dublin, was given to Bligh to contain the urn.

    The MCC has remained the custodian of the laws of cricket whilst Lords cricket museum still contains the most celebrated collection of sports memorabilia in the world.

    From its early origins cricket is now played in over 100 countries around the world

     

    Written by Selby

    cricketcollectables.net/

     

     

     


     

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    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, early origins of cricket, sports memorabilia

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