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  • Jimmy Anderson hopes for wickets record

    Posted on March 21, 2013 by Selby

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    Jimmy Anderson is looking at the New Zealand v England Test at Eden Park as a further step towards becoming England’s leading wicket taker.

    Anderson needs only 3 wickets to surpass Derek Underwood’s tally of 297 wickets before concentrating on the top 3 bowlers. As he moves in the direction of Ian Botham’s record of 383 wickets taken over a total of 102 matches he is not helped by the New Zealand surfaces which have so far been flat and relatively unresponsive.

    Cricket memorabilia from the New Zealand v England Test and ODI series is very popular especially signed cricket bats and match used cricket balls, so far this winter in the Southern Hemisphere has been excellent for both.

    Having averaged an enviable 30 wickets per year so far it is really about all about how long he can continue playing at Test level. Best of luck to him.

    It is interesting to note the following stats:

    Ian Botham                   383 wickets per 102 matches played (28.4)

    Bob Willis                      325 wickets per 90   matches played (25.2)

    Freddie Trueman         307 wickets per 67 matches played (21.5)

    Derek Underwood      297 wickets per 86 matches played (25.8

    Jimmy Anderson         295 wickets per 79 matches played (30.4)

    As is evident from the bowling averages my number one bowler Freddie Trueman comes in first as expected with an average of 21.5 and note that he only played 67 matches to achieve 307 wickets.

    Without Kevin Peterson tomorrow England have it all to do, anyway let’s hope the rain keeps off and that the wicket for the deciding Test of the series at Eden Park, offers more to the bowlers.

    Tony Selby 


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, Don Bradman Memorabilia, Signed Cricket Bats, james anderson, New Zealand v England at Eden Park, freddie trueman, bob willis, derek underwood

  • History of Cricket

    Posted on February 6, 2013 by Selby


    A brief history of Cricket

    Sadly there is very little Cricket Memorabilia from the early days of the game and the earliest that I have collated has been late 19th century. The MCC museum has been collecting artefacts since 1864

    .Today with International Test and ODI Cricket Collectables are more popular than ever; I personally still prefer to collect Pre WW2 Items especially from the Ashes Series,Bradman and the Invincibles, Bodyline series and all the other legendary characters and memorable events. Particularly I collect signed cricket bats, cricket photos, RPP postcards, signed team sheets and Tour Itineraries.

    Early records show Cricket was played in the South East of England around the middle of the sixteenth century, usually on a Sunday afternoon as a way of relaxing from the arduous week, which was the norm for many fortunate to have employment.

    Early mentions of the game in 1610 refer to Creckett being played in the woodland areas of the Weald and Upland close to Chevening Kent, in those days playing conditions meant that wickets were up to 6ft wide and only around a foot high which figures as underarm bowling was usual, with the ball travelling along the surface to the pitch. Bats were shaped like hockey sticks, earlier still like shepherds crooks.

    County cricket teams are first recorded in 1660 when landowners and similar notable figures are understood to have taken an interest in fielding teams to play against neighbouring Shires, villages from other counties would compete and some players were compensated for playing becoming the first cricket professionals. Records are available for the first inter county match Kent v Surrey in 1709

    It is known that gambling in England around this time was rife and substantial wagers are understood to have been placed on Cricket matches, (rather like today). It is referenced in 1697 that a match was played in Sussex with 11 players a side for a wager of the considerable sum of 50 guineas

    It is interesting to note that the divide in English cricket created by amateur and professional status remained in place until 1962. This was due a requirement for clubs to generate income and generally to put sport on a more professional basis.

    The Stars and Garter club in Pall Mall, later to become the Marylebone Cricket Club formalised the laws of cricket in 1755 and amongst other things pitching the ball became the accepted bowling style.

    It was 1864 before overarm deliveries became usual, the same year that the Wisden Cricketers Almanack was first published.

    Public school matches are recorded as played in 1794 the first being Westminster v Charterhouse.

    England lost their first recognised Test Match in 1877 against Australia in Melbourne the hosts won by 45 runs, three years later the first Test series was played in England when they defeated the tourists by five wickets at the Oval this was followed by an Australian win in the return series in 1882.

    Following England’s first defeat by Australia on home ground in 1882 the Sporting Times periodical published an obituary notice stating that “the England team are in Ashes”, this led to England v Australia Test matches being referred to as the Ashes series.

    Since then more than 2000 Test Matches have been played by eleven competing teams.

    The Ashes are kept; irrespective of who wins them, in a small ceramic urn at Lords Cricket Museum, which incidentally has the best collection of Cricket memorabilia in the world, well worth a visit.

    .A label is attached to the urn which contains the following song lyric originally published in the Melbourne edition of Punch magazine on Feb 1st 1883

    When Ivo goes back with the urn, the urn; Studds, Steel, Read and Tylecote return, return; The welkin will ring loud, The great crowd will feel proud, Seeing Barlow and Bates with the urn, the urn; And the rest coming home with the urn.

    Prior to the disputed Fourth Test held in Feb 1883, a velvet bag made by Mrs Ann Fletcher, daughter of Joseph Hines Clarke and Marion Wright, of Dublin, was given to Ivo Bligh containing the urn.

    A more detailed account of how the Ashes were given to Ivo Bligh was outlined by his wife, the Countess of Darnley, in 1930 during a speech at a cricket luncheon. Her speech was reported by the London Times as follows.

    In 1882, she said, it was first spoken of when the Sporting Times, after the Australians had thoroughly beaten the English at the Oval, wrote an obituary in affectionate memory of English cricket “whose demise was deeply lamented and the body would be cremated and taken to Australia”. Her husband, then Ivo Bligh, took a team to Australia in the following year. Punch had a poem containing the words “When Ivo comes back with the urn” and when Ivo Bligh wiped out the defeat Lady Clarke, wife of Sir W. J. Clarke, who entertained the English so lavishly, found a little wooden urn, burnt a bail, put the ashes in the urn, and wrapping it in a red velvet bag, put it into her husband’s (Ivo Bligh’s) hands. He had always regarded it as a great treasure.”[11]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ashes#Urn

    From early 16th century beginnings Cricket is now played enthusiastically in over 100 countries around the world, collecting Cricket Memorabilia is indeed a worthwhile hobby or small business.

     

    Written by Tony Selby

    CricketCollectables


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with sports memorabilia, cricket collectables, Don Bradman Memorabilia, bodyline series, Signed Cricket Bats, history of cricket, cricket photos, rpp postcards, ashes series, mcc, lords cricket ground

  • India v England ODI Cricket Memorabilia

    Posted on January 15, 2013 by Selby

    India v England ODI Cricket Memorabilia

    India is back on winning form at the 2nd ODI  Nehru Stadium Kochi

    The hosts won the toss, elected to bat making a score of 285 runs then promptly dismissed the tourists for 158 in 36 overs levelling the series.

    Captain Singh Dhoni scored an impressive 72 off 66 balls to the delight of a 70.000 home crowd before a much needed catch taken by Joe Root off Jade Dernbach whilst no 7 bat Ravindra Jadeja impressed with 67 runs off 37 balls finishing the match off in style with 14 runs off the last 3 deliveries. Steven Finn and Jade Dernbach ended on 2 wickets apiece

    With Kevin Pietersen (42 off 58) Inc. seven 4s and Eoin Morgan out for a duck, the pair were both dismissed in the space of three deliveries, a major turning point in the game, Patel 30 not out hit the only six compared with 7 hit by the Indian side.

    Kumars 3/29, Jadeja 2/12 and Ashwin 3/39 look as though they are coming into form at the right time and will need to be watched at Ranchi.

    Maybe the Indians have been knocked recently having lost India v Pakistan and the all-important Test series to England, but this will put them back in the game.

    Cricket Memorabilia from the series is relatively prolific, signed cricket bats, presentations and cricket autographs, a decent performance by England for the rest of the series can only enhance these collectables.

    All to play for at the 3rd ODI, JSCA Stadium Ranchi on Saturday Jan 19th.

    Tony Selby


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket collectables, ashes cricket memorabilia, Signed Cricket Bats, cricket autographs, Alastair Cook, Kevin Pietersen, india v england 2nd odi, england v india odi

  • Signed Cricket Bats

    Posted on May 12, 2012 by Selby

     


     

    England v Australia 1932/33 Bodyline series, Cricket Memorabilia.

    Signed Cricket Bats which have survived the infamous Australia v England Bodyline Series 1932/33 are highly sought after as Cricket Collectables, match used bats which are signed by both teams are especially in demand as they are considered rare.

    When collecting signed cricket bats it can be useful to specialise in specific areas say Test Cricket, First Class Matches, Ashes series. Pre-war and post war etc. I try to concentrate on pre-war,  assembling a pre-war collection can be expensive and time consuming yet at the same time a very enjoyable and rewarding experience.

    It is fact that some cricketers were always more prolific when it came to Autographs and if approached at Cricket grounds from Lords to the Kensington Oval Barbados would happily oblige fans, an example would be Don Bradman arguably the greatest cricketer of all who would readily provide his autograph whereas Sid Barnes has rarely put pen to willow and when he did it was often stamped

    It stands to reason that when a cricketer is no longer with us his legacy to the enthusiast is his autograph, there can only be so many examples before the rarity aspect play its part.

    With some effort the Cricket Enthusiast can follow auctions and sales around the world make notes and compile lists of signatories with a rarity value.   Often sought after individual Cricket Bat autographs are found as part of a team signing, these cricket bats especially when signed by both sides, possibly with Umpires and Manager s included can be great buys, I personally try to concentrate on Pre-War Ashes Matches, England v West Indies, India, South Africa and New Zealand plus some of the County Championship Clubs, where many of the legendary test player’s have emanated from, in my collection I have examples of Middlesex, Nottinghamshire, MCC, Sussex, Surrey, Worcester, Lancashire and Yorkshire autographed match used bats

    It is important that Autographed Cricket bats are related to memorable events, legendary players and successful teams this is why there is so much demand for Ashes test match memorabilia.

    I am currently interested in autographs and Cricket Memorabilia associated with the 1932/33 Bodyline series.

    Signed Cricket Bats which have recently come available from private collections or sales include rare examples from the England v Australia series 1932/33.(note Bradman was missing in the 1st Test at Sydney due to illness) Below is a detailed list of matches played during the series compiled by cricinfo

     

    Fri Oct 21 - Mon Oct 24 Western Australia v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Western Australia Cricket Association Ground, Perth
    Thu Oct 27 - Sat Oct 29 Australian XI v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Western Australia Cricket Association Ground, Perth
    Fri Nov 4 - Tue Nov 8 South Australia v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Adelaide Oval
    Fri Nov 11 - Mon Nov 14 Victoria v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Melbourne Cricket Ground
    Fri Nov 18 - Tue Nov 22 Australian XI v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Melbourne Cricket Ground
    Fri Nov 25 - Tue Nov 29 New South Wales v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Sydney Cricket Ground
    Fri Dec 2 - Wed Dec 7 1st Test - Australia v England
    Sydney Cricket Ground
    Fri Dec 16 - Mon Dec 19 Tasmania v Marylebone Cricket Club
    North Tasmania Cricket Association Ground, Launceston
    Fri Dec 23 - Mon Dec 26 Tasmania v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Tasmania Cricket Association Ground, Hobart
    Fri Dec 30 - Tue Jan 3 2nd Test - Australia v England
    Melbourne Cricket Ground
    Fri Jan 13 - Thu Jan 19 3rd Test - Australia v England
    Adelaide Oval
    Thu Jan 26 - Sat Jan 28 New South Wales v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Sydney Cricket Ground
    Wed Feb 1 - Thu Feb 2 Queensland Country v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Showground, Toowoomba
    Sat Feb 4 - Tue Feb 7 Queensland v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Brisbane Cricket Ground, Woolloongabba, Brisbane
    Fri Feb 10 - Thu Feb 16 4th Test - Australia v England
    Brisbane Cricket Ground, Woolloongabba, Brisbane
    Sat Feb 18 - Tue Feb 21 Northern New South Wales v Marylebone Cricket Club
    No 1 Sports Ground, Newcastle
    Thu Feb 23 - Tue Feb 28 5th Test - Australia v England
    Sydney Cricket Ground
    Fri Mar 3 - Tue Mar 7 Victoria v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Melbourne Cricket Ground
    Fri Mar 10 - Tue Mar 14 South Australia v Marylebone Cricket Club
    Adelaide Oval  Compiled by cricinfo

    Any cricket memorabilia associated with this series will always be in demand by collectors and fans alike.

    Modern day signed Cricket bats are far more readily available, it has become popular for Test Cricketer to carry out signings where a large number of bats may be autographed in one session many used for charitable purposes, these bats can make great additions to a portfolio and in time will increase in rarity value however for the moment I am sticking with seeking out the pre-war and early to mid-fifties examples.

    Good luck with your collecting

    Let me know how you get on??

    Tony Selby

    Cricket Memorabilia

     

     

     


    This post was posted in Cricket memorabilia and was tagged with cricket memorabilia, sports memorabilia, sports collectables, cricket collectables, test cricket, Sports Memorabila, bodyline series, don bradman cricket memorabilia, ashes cricket memorabilia, Signed Cricket Bats

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